Science

  • Once again, volcanic Caribbean island looks to recovery
    on April 17, 2021 at 9:48 am

    A group of nervous fish sellers got very close to La Soufrière, the volcano on the Caribbean island of St. Vincent, on the morning of May 7, 1902.

  • Two Russian cosmonauts, NASA astronaut return from ISS
    on April 17, 2021 at 9:44 am

    Two Russian cosmonauts and a NASA astronaut touched down Saturday on the steppe of Kazakhstan following a half-year mission on the International Space Station, footage broadcast by the Russian space agency showed.

  • New amphibious centipede species discovered in Okinawa and Taiwan
    on April 17, 2021 at 4:00 am

    Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University and Hosei University have discovered a new species of large, tropical centipede of genus Scolopendra in Okinawa and Taiwan. It is only the third amphibious centipede identified in the world, and is the largest in the region, 20 cm long and nearly 2 cm thick. It is also the first new centipede to be identified in Japan in 143 years, testament to the incredible biodiversity of the Ryukyu Archipelago.

  • Heart patients advised to move more to avoid heart attacks and strokes
    on April 17, 2021 at 4:00 am

    Elevated blood pressure, high cholesterol and diabetes increase the risk of heart disease. But a large study today reveals that in people with these conditions, increasing activity levels is associated with a reduced likelihood of heart events and mortality. The research is presented at ESC Preventive Cardiology 2021, an online scientific congress of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).

  • NASA chooses SpaceX to take humans back to Moon
    on April 16, 2021 at 9:25 pm

    NASA has selected SpaceX to land the first astronauts on the surface of the Moon since 1972, the agency said Friday, in a huge victory for Elon Musk's company.

  • New blast at St. Vincent volcano; cruise ship helps evacuees
    on April 16, 2021 at 9:10 pm

    La Soufriere volcano shot out another explosive burst of gas and ash on Friday as a cruise ship arrived to evacuate some of the foreigners who had been stuck on a St. Vincent island coated in ash from a week of violent eruptions.

  • 'Godzilla' shark discovered in New Mexico gets formal name
    on April 16, 2021 at 9:09 pm

    The 300-million-year-old shark's teeth were the first sign that it might be a distinct species.

  • SpaceX's next crew arrives in Florida for Earth Day launch
    on April 16, 2021 at 9:08 pm

    SpaceX's most international crew of astronauts yet arrived at their launch site Friday.

  • Tarantula's ubiquity traced back to the cretaceous
    on April 16, 2021 at 9:01 pm

    Tarantulas are among the most notorious spiders, due in part to their size, vibrant colors and prevalence throughout the world. But one thing most people don't know is that tarantulas are homebodies. Females and their young rarely leave their burrows and only mature males will wander to seek out a mate. How then did such a sedentary spider come to inhabit six out of seven continents?

  • On the pulse of pulsars and polar light
    on April 16, 2021 at 8:59 pm

    Faced with the tragic loss of the Arecibo observatory in Puerto Rico and the often prohibitive cost of satellite missions, astronomers are searching for savvy alternatives to continue answering fundamental questions in physics.

  • Simulations reveal how dominant SARS-CoV-2 strain binds to host, succumbs to antibodies
    on April 16, 2021 at 8:58 pm

    Large-scale supercomputer simulations at the atomic level show that the dominant G form variant of the COVID-19-causing virus is more infectious partly because of its greater ability to readily bind to its target host receptor in the body, compared to other variants. These research results from a Los Alamos National Laboratory-led team illuminate the mechanism of both infection by the G form and antibody resistance against it, which could help in future vaccine development.

  • Unconventional takes on pandemics and nuclear defense could protect humanity from catastrophic failure
    on April 16, 2021 at 8:57 pm

    From engineered pandemics to city-toppling cyber attacks to nuclear annihilation, life on Earth could radically change, and soon. Scientists will forecast the fate of the planet at a press conference during the 2021 APS April Meeting.

  • Scientists may detect signs of extraterrestrial life in the next 5 to 10 years
    on April 16, 2021 at 8:56 pm

    Research shows that a new telescope could detect a potential signature of life on other planets in as little as 60 hours.

  • The future of particle accelerators is here
    on April 16, 2021 at 8:55 pm

    When the Electron Ion Collider received the go-ahead in January 2020, it became the only new major accelerator in the works anywhere in the world.

  • New analysis finds Spotted Owls harmed by post-fire logging, not fire
    on April 16, 2021 at 8:52 pm

    Are forest fires a threat to the imperiled Spotted Owl? For years, different groups of scientists assumed so, but a new study turns this assumption on its head. Researchers from the John Muir Project, Pennsylvania State University, and Wild Nature Institute found that these previous studies consistently had a serious methodological flaw: they failed to take into account the impact of post-fire logging on Spotted Owls.

  • The Trojan-Horse mechanism: How networks reduce gender segregation
    on April 16, 2021 at 6:00 pm

    The social science literature has long viewed homophily and network-based job recruitment as crucial drivers of segregation. Researchers at Linköping University and ESADE, Ramon Llull University, now show that this view must be revised. In their Science Advances article, they call attention to a previously unidentified factor, the Trojan horse mechanism, which shows that network-based recruitment can reduce rather than increase segregation levels.

  • Researchers develop microscopic theory of polymer gel
    on April 16, 2021 at 5:20 pm

    Russian scientists have proposed a theory of phase transformation in polymer gels. It explains the mechanisms of the dramatic reduction in volume of zwitterionic hydrogels when they are cooled. The results are published in the journal Chemical Communications (ChemComm).

  • Bottom trawling harms the ocean—and the climate
    on April 16, 2021 at 5:10 pm

    The destructive effects of ocean-bottom trawling are easy enough to imagine from any basic description of the practice. Heavy nets 100 yards wide, equipped with weighted rollers and steel doors, are dragged across the seafloor to scoop up cod, halibut, flounder, rockfish, shrimp and other deep-dwelling prey.

  • How to save beaches and coastlines from climate change disasters
    on April 16, 2021 at 5:00 pm

    The frequency of natural disasters has soared in recent decades. Total damage topped $210 billion worldwide in 2020. With climate change, the costs attributed to coastal storms will increase dramatically.

  • Scores of tule elk died at Point Reyes seashore in 2020. Are their days numbered?
    on April 16, 2021 at 4:50 pm

    Tule elk are treasured creatures in California, and for years, animal rights groups have butted heads with the Point Reyes National Seashore over its practice of keeping elk fenced away from nearby cattle ranches.

  • A new super-Earth detected orbiting a red dwarf star
    on April 16, 2021 at 4:47 pm

    In recent years there has been an exhaustive study of red dwarf stars to find exoplanets in orbit around them. These stars have effective surface temperatures between 2400 and 3700 K (over 2000 degrees cooler than the Sun), and masses between 0.08 and 0.45 solar masses. In this context, a team of researchers led by Borja Toledo Padrón, a Severo Ochoa-La Caixa doctoral student at the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC), specializing in the search for planets around this type of stars, […]

  • Hidden magma pools pose eruption risks that we can't yet detect
    on April 16, 2021 at 4:47 pm

    Boulder, Colo., USA: Volcanologists' ability to estimate eruption risks is largely reliant on knowing where pools of magma are stored, deep in the Earth's crust. But what happens if the magma can't be spotted?

  • Differences in national food security best explained by household income, not agriculture
    on April 16, 2021 at 4:46 pm

    One of the most comprehensive statistical analyses of drivers of food insecurity across 65 countries has concluded that household income consistently explains more discrepancy in food security than any other factor, including agricultural land resources and production. The Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth study, "Cross-national analysis of food security drivers: comparing results based on the Food Insecurity Experience Scale and Global Food Security Index," was recently published by […]

  • Corporations agree to transparency on climate lobbying
    on April 16, 2021 at 4:44 pm

    Insurer American International Group Inc., railroad company CSX Inc. and electric companies Duke Energy Corp., FirstEnergy Corp. and Entergy Corp. have pledged to report publicly about their influence on climate policy and alignment with the Paris Agreement, according to investors.

  • Fruit flies give researchers new insights into the 'highway of the nerve cells'
    on April 16, 2021 at 4:42 pm

    The nervous system is the internet of the human body and can in the same way transfer signals over long distances very quickly. Some of the most important elements in this signaling are the axons. They are projections of the nerve cells which send signals to other nerve cells or muscles. For instance, axons that jut out from nerve cells in the spinal cord can be over one meter long.

  • Scientists call for climate projections as part of more robust biodiversity conservation
    on April 16, 2021 at 4:42 pm

    Scientists have called for the use of climate projections in conservation planning, to ensure that areas most at risk from biodiversity loss and climate impacts are protected. Protected areas are often created in areas of low population density and remote locations, rather than because of their biodiversity conservation potential. Conservation planning in tropical forests especially tends to be less rigorous and climate rarely taken into account, they said.

  • Natural gas leading source of EU's power emissions
    on April 16, 2021 at 4:42 pm

    Gas power plants overtook lignite coal plants in 2020 to become the European Union's largest single source of emissions from electricity, an analysis of the bloc's Emissions Trading Scheme showed Friday.

  • Oldest piece of writing ever found in Israel identified on ancient shard of pottery
    on April 16, 2021 at 3:30 pm

    A team of researchers from the Austrian Academy of Science's, Austrian Archaeological Institute, and the Hebrew University of Jerusalem's Institute of Archeology, has identified a piece of writing on a shard of pottery unearthed in 2018 at the Lachish archaeological site as the oldest piece of writing ever found in Israel. In their paper published in Cambridge University Press's, Antiquity, the group describes studying the writing and what they learned about it.

  • Designed proteins assemble antibodies into modular nanocages
    on April 16, 2021 at 3:30 pm

    In a new report now published on Science, Robby Divine and an interdisciplinary research team at the department of biochemistry, regenerative medicine, and vaccines and infectious disease at the University of Washington U.S. and the School of Medicine, at the Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran, conducted computational designs of nanocages to assemble antibodies into precise architectures. During the construction, one structural component formed an antibody or Fc-ligand fusion and the […]

  • Fast radio bursts shown to include lower frequency radio waves than previously detected
    on April 16, 2021 at 3:11 pm

    Since fast radio bursts (FRBs) were first discovered over a decade ago, scientists have puzzled over what could be generating these intense flashes of radio waves from outside of our galaxy. In a gradual process of elimination, the field of possible explanations has narrowed as new pieces of information are gathered about FRBs—how long they last, the frequencies of the radio waves detected, and so on.

  • You're not imagining it: 3 ways COVID-19 has been extra hard on American parents
    on April 16, 2021 at 3:10 pm

    For over a year, Americans have been struggling with the challenges imposed on them by the global coronavirus pandemic. While all Americans have struggled, the pandemic has imposed three distinctive sets of burdens on the 64 million Americans living with children under the age of 18.

  • Quality and quantity of enrichments influence well-being of aquaculture fishes
    on April 16, 2021 at 3:05 pm

    Collaborative research of the University of Jyvaskyla and Natural Research Institute Finland presents new evidence of the effects of enriched rearing on well-being of aquaculture fishes. The research demonstrates that stone enrichments that have been previously conditioned in lake water significantly improve survival of fish compared to clean stones. Also a higher number of stones has a similar positive effect. The results have practical implications for prevention of aquaculture diseases. The […]

  • Combining news media and AI to rapidly identify flooded buildings
    on April 16, 2021 at 4:00 am

    Artificial intelligence (AI) has sped up the process of detecting flooded buildings immediately after a large-scale flood, allowing emergency personnel to direct their efforts efficiently. Now, a research group from Tohoku University has created a machine learning (ML) model that uses news media photos to identify flooded buildings accurately within 24 hours of the disaster.

  • Neural plasticity depends on this long noncoding RNA's journey from nucleus to synapse
    on April 16, 2021 at 4:00 am

    A synaptically localized long noncoding RNA proves to be an important regulator of neural plasticity.

  • Surprise twist suggests stars grow competitively
    on April 16, 2021 at 4:00 am

    A survey of star formation activity in the Orion Nebula Cluster found similar mass distributions for newborn stars and dense gas cores, which may evolve into stars. Counterintuitively, this means that the amount of gas a core accretes as it develops, and not the initial mass of the core, is the key factor in deciding the final mass of the produced star.

  • Tarantula's ubiquity traced back to the cretaceous
    on April 16, 2021 at 4:00 am

    Tarantulas are among the most notorious spiders, due in part to their size, vibrant colors and prevalence throughout the world. But one thing most people don't know is that tarantulas are homebodies. Females and their young rarely leave their burrows and only mature males will wander to seek out a mate. How then did such a sedentary spider come to inhabit six out of seven continents?

  • Simulations reveal how dominant SARS-CoV-2 strain binds to host, succumbs to antibodies
    on April 16, 2021 at 4:00 am

    Large-scale supercomputer simulations at the atomic level show that the dominant G form variant of the COVID-19-causing virus is more infectious partly because of its greater ability to readily bind to its target host receptor in the body, compared to other variants.

  • Virginia Tech and UVA virologists develop broadly protective coronavirus vaccines
    on April 16, 2021 at 4:00 am

    A candidate vaccine that could provide protection against the COVID-19 virus and other coronaviruses has shown promising results in early animal testing.

  • An antibody-drug combo to combat cancer
    on April 16, 2021 at 4:00 am

    Researchers at Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) have developed an ingenious therapeutic strategy against chronic myelomonocytic leukemia that links a cytotoxic drug payload to an antibody vector that targets the CD64 marker highly expressed by monocytes and monocytic progenitors. This selective antibody-drug conjugate spares other blood cell lineages thus avoiding the side-effects of conventional anti-cancer drugs such as anemia, infection or bleeding diatheses. Consequently, this […]

  • Study identifies new targets in the angiogenesis process
    on April 16, 2021 at 4:00 am

    The study has demonstrated the involvement of a new Ca2+ ion entry pathway in angiogenesis processes and the formation of new blood vessels. This Ca2+ pathway is known as SOCE (store operated Ca2+ entry).

  • Experiments cast doubts on the existence of quantum spin liquids
    on April 16, 2021 at 4:00 am

    A quantum spin liquid is a state of matter in which interacting quantum spins do not align even at lowest temperatures, but remain disordered. Research on this state has been going on for almost 50 years, but whether it really exists has never been proven beyond doubt. An international team led by physicist Prof. Martin Dressel at the University of Stuttgart has now put an end to the dream of a quantum spin liquid for the time being. Nevertheless, the matter remains exciting.

  • Dust at work can lead to rheumatic diseases
    on April 16, 2021 at 4:00 am

    If you are exposed to silica (quartz) dust at work - e.g. from working with concrete and granite - you have a greater risk of certain types of rheumatic disease. This is shown by results from Aarhus University and Aarhus University Hospital, which have just been published in the International Journal of Epidemiology.

  • Researchers develop microscopic theory of polymer gel
    on April 16, 2021 at 4:00 am

    Russian scientists have proposed a theory of phase transformation in polymer gels. It explains the mechanisms of the dramatic reduction in volume of zwitterionic hydrogels when they are cooled. The results are published in the journal Chemical Communications (ChemComm).

  • Underweight and overweight women at higher risk of successive miscarriages
    on April 16, 2021 at 4:00 am

    A new study has shown that underweight and overweight women are at a significantly higher risk of experiencing recurrent miscarriages compared to those of average weight.

  • Experimental antiviral for COVID-19 effective in hamster study
    on April 16, 2021 at 4:00 am

    The experimental antiviral drug MK-4482 significantly decreased levels of virus and disease damage in the lungs of hamsters treated for SARS-CoV-2 infection, according to a new study from NIH scientists. MK-4482, delivered orally, is now in human clinical trials. Remdesivir, an antiviral drug already approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for use against COVID-19, must be provided intravenously, making its use primarily limited to clinical settings.

  • Generation of super-resolved optical needle and multifocal array using graphene oxide metalenses
    on April 16, 2021 at 4:00 am

    Generation of super-resolved optical needle and multifocal array using graphene oxide metalensesIn a new publication from Opto-Electronic Advances; DOI https://doi.org/10.29026/oea.2021.200031, Researchers led by Professor Baohua Jia at Swinburne University of Technology, Victoria, Australia, Professor Cheng-Wei Qiu at National University of Singapore, Singapore and Professor Tian Lan at Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing, China considered the generation of super-resolved optical needle […]

  • Fast radio bursts shown to include lower frequency radio waves than previously detected
    on April 16, 2021 at 4:00 am

    A team led by McGill University researchers and members of Canada's CHIME Fast Radio Burst collaboration has established that fast radio bursts (FRBs) include radio waves at frequencies lower than ever detected before, a discovery that redraws the boundaries for theoretical astrophysicists trying to put their finger on the source of FRBs.

  • Autism develops differently in girls than boys, new research suggests
    on April 16, 2021 at 4:00 am

    New research sheds light on how autism-spectrum disorder manifests in the brains of girls, prompting the scientists to warn that conclusions drawn from studies conducted primarily in boys should not be assumed to hold true for girls.

  • Egg and sperm cell size evolved from competition
    on April 16, 2021 at 4:00 am

    Using mathematical modeling, researchers considered a time very early in evolution when primordial species reproduced using external fertilization. In the model, bigger reproductive cells, or gametes, presented a competitive edge because they could hold more nutrients for a potential zygote. Smaller gametes, however, required fewer resources to make, which put less stress on the parent. Organisms evolved to specialize in large or small gametes, precursors to eggs and sperm.

  • Leonardo da Vinci definitely did not sculpt the Flora bust
    on April 16, 2021 at 4:00 am

    Wilhelm Bode did not budge an inch: the sculpture he acquired in 1909 was an as yet unknown production of the great Renaissance master, Leonardo da Vinci. After one hundred years and numerous controversies, a group of scientists led by a CNRS researcher has just proven him wrong once and for all.